Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 1Department of Medical Entomology and Vector Control, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

2 Research Center for Health Sciences, Institute of Health, Department of Medical Entomology and Vector Control, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

3 Department of Medical Entomology and Vector Control, School of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

4 Infectious Diseases Control Unit, Health Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Abstract

Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) on malaria control with respect to indoor residual spraying (IRS) in a community of Southern Iran.
Introduction: Human malaria is an important vector-borne infectious disease in Iran. It remains endemic over most parts of the oriental region of Iran that is still in the pre-elimination phase without considerable drop in the proportion of malaria cases.
Methods: This research was a cross-sectional household survey conducted in Kazerun, Fars province, Iran, to examine he malaria status and identify the parameters that obstruct the progress of the elimination phase. A standard questionnaire with 20 questions was provided to households including knowledge, attitude and practice categories. Sampling was then stratified to choose the samples in three rural foci of Kazerun.
Results: The sex ratio of participants included 192 females (92.3%) and 16 males (7.7%), respectively. This community benefited mostly from acceptable literacy level. A strong association prevailed between the majority of respondents’ (88.5%) knowledge of fever and chills as the main symptoms of malaria and their literacy level. The majority (198, 95.2%) of volunteers declared that malaria disease was transmitted through the mosquito bites. In line with this study, literate persons have raised motivation and attitude to use bednets and keep themselves away from mosquitoes. These individuals cooperate perfectly with healthcare workers in malaria control program strategies (especially IRS).
Conclusion: Comprehensive and synergistic measures are needed to be taken to manage malaria elimination strategy in Iran.

Keywords

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